Tech Conference CFPs: Where To Find Them

ConferenceSeats

CC 2.0 image courtesy eltpics on Flickr

As a Microsoft MVP, my job is to help people with their technical problems. I also advise people who are looking to get started on the road to being an MVP. For some it could be by blogging or by answering forum questions, for others it could be by speaking at technical events.

Background

I have been asked a few times in the last while about how to get started speaking. Being a technical speaker is a great way to share your knowledge, build a name for yourself, travel, and attend conferences for free. You also meet many people who can help you as you move through your career.

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.NET Core SDK Upgrade

I have been experimenting with .NET Core for a while now and I have also been trying to keep my .NET Core SDK versions up to date. I noticed though there is not much direction from Microsoft about how to upgrade the SDK version. I could not see any information about whether one should uninstall the previous version or overwrite the existing with the new SDK. So I am posting my findings around updating the .NET Core SDK.

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Microsoft Technical Guru – December 2016

The TechNet Guru December 2016 Winners have been announced.

This time I won a Bronze medal in the Microsoft Azure category for my article Understanding the Azure App Service Editor.

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2016 Year in Review

new-year

With the new year upon us, it’s always worthwhile to reflect on the previous year.

So, just like I did last year, I compiled a list of general stats about this blog from 2016:

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Checking compatibility with .NET Portability Analyzer

This article is also available on the Microsoft TechNet Wiki.

With multiple project types now available in Visual Studio, it can sometimes get confusing which flavours of .NET work with which frameworks. This can now be compounded with .NET Core. Thus, creating code that is reusable means you need to take all factors into consideration so you can get maximum portability. Luckily, there is a tool that can help you port your .NET projects.

The Microsoft .NET Portability Analyzer is a free Visual Studio Add-in that offers a detailed report on the flexibility of your code. The report gives you an idea of how much work you need to do to make your application, library or project workable on other platforms, including .NET Core.

In this article, we will see how to install, set up and run the tool so we can see the detailed report it generates.

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Visual Studio’s Most Recently Used List

This article is also available on the Microsoft TechNet Wiki.

When presenting with Visual Studio at a conference, or if you want to share something with a client, you might not want to show all of your previous projects. To remedy this, Microsoft allows you to collapse and extend your Most Recently Used (MRU) list within Visual Studio 2015.

The default number of projects and files shown in Visual Studio 2015 is 10. If you are working on a large project, you can extend this number and if you want to see a smaller number of files, you can reduce it. As well, if you are presenting you can also set the number to zero to show no earlier items.

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